Graduate Program in Health Management


Dual Degree Program


Testimonials

 

 

Joyce Chung, MBA/MPH 2011

 

Why the MBA/MPH?

Recruiters and employers really understand the value of the MBA/MPH. In both my internships, I received consistent, positive feedback on the strength of my health care knowledge. I attribute this to the dual degree program, having limited industry experience prior to school. Through classroom and experiential learning opportunities, the MBA/MPH offers incredible access to the best thinking around health care today. The complexity of the health care system and its multiple stakeholders are deconstructed so that you truly become competent as a health care leader. Because the class is so small and diverse, I was able to build deep relationships with both current students and alumni. Not only did this make my career search easier, it contributed to interesting and insightful conversations inside and outside the classroom.

 

Richard Fessler, MBA/MPH 2013

 

Why did you chose to come to Haas and be a part of the dual degree program?

I chose Haas because of its people. The diversity of my classmates, the exposure to leading faculty, and the access to Haas’s extensive alumni community all contribute to the strength of the program. I specifically chose the MBA/MPH program at Haas because I knew that the business foundation from the MBA coursework would be greatly enhanced by the access to students, courses, faculty, and alumni associated with the School of Public Health. One benefit of the dual degree program is having two summers in which to try out two internships in different healthcare sectors. Another benefit is the small class size, which encourages close relationships among students and between students and faculty while still providing access to the larger MBA and MPH communities. Finally, the Bay Area is a hotbed for healthcare and a fantastic place to live with excellent culture, food, and outdoor adventures.


Cristin Gendron, MBA/MPH 07


What did you do before coming to Berkeley?

I graduated from UC Santa Cruz with a degree in biochemistry and molecular biology (emphasis in pharmacology). Following my undergraduate studies, I worked for 5+ years as a medicinal chemist at Theravance, Inc., a medium-sized biopharmaceutical company in South San Francisco. My work focused on the discovery of novel medicines for various diseases including respiratory and gastrointestinal disorders.

Why did you join the program?

My goal in pursuing a graduate degree in health management (MBA/MPH) from UC Berkeley was to transition from the early stages of drug discovery to a role where I could have a greater impact on the end goal: getting medicines to the patients who need them. I wanted to be involved in strategic decision-making toward the development and commercialization of novel therapeutics. In order to be effective at this role, I needed the foundation of business acumen offered in an MBA program. However, because the health industry has an added level of complexity-- an interconnected web of players and stakeholders such as hospitals, insurers, and regulators-- I felt it was critical to gain a thorough understanding of the industry from the point of view of business and public health. GPHM has been an exceptional match to my needs and goals. Furthermore, its location in the epicenter of biopharmaceutical activities provided a unique opportunity to best facilitate my career transition.

Did you consider the certificate program?

No. Because my previous work experience was in the pharmaceutical/biotechnology industry, I felt it was in my best interests to be in a program that would help me to better understand the health industry from various stakeholders' points of view. The MBA/MPH program offers an expansive curriculum that is interesting and informative and provides excellent insights from the standpoints of all the players in healthcare.

What healthcare-related activities did you pursue during the program?

The MBA/MPH program provides a hands-on experience for students. It is the type of program where a student can be heavily involved in creating and leading extracurricular events if they so choose. I was involved in a number of healthcare-related activities:

  • The Berkeley BioBusiness Association (B3A). I was a co-president of the Berkeley BioBusiness Association in 2005-06. This experience was a great opportunity to work closely with peers who have similar interests, to meet industry professionals in varying functional roles across the health sector, and, of course, to provide a "crash course" on the art of leadership.
  • Kellogg Biotech Case Competition. I was part of a team of five Haas students who participated in Kellogg School of Management's 2007 Annual Biotech Case Competition. The case involved an ethical question that a biotechnology company faced when designing a clinical trial. Our team won first place-- the judges said we had a "creative approach" and a clear passion for the subject, and I believe my training within the MBA/MPH program helped improve my contribution to the team's achievement.
  • International Business Development (IBD) Program. I considered myself fortunate to have been given one of the healthcare-related IBD projects. Along with three other Haas students, I worked on developing a strategic and execution plan for the development of a community health education and outreach program in Ghana. We worked closely with a local non-profit company in the months leading up to the trip and the three weeks spent in-country to develop a maximally feasible and sustainable plan. The project was challenging and I learned a great deal about international health in developing countries.
  • MBA/MPH Admissions Committee. The MBA/MPH class is undeniably a family. Our program is designed to be a small, close-knit and supportive team. I wanted to play an integral role in building the following year's MBA/MPH team and volunteered to be on the MBA/MPH admissions committee.

What healthcare class did you enjoy most?

My favorite healthcare class was Professor Kristi Raube's Healthcare in the 21st Century. Coming from the biopharmaceutical/biotechnology sector, I was relatively unaware of how the US healthcare system functioned as a whole. Learning about the key stakeholders and how they work together (or do not work together) was paramount to my academic experience. After taking Professor Raube's class, I feel better prepared to have discussions regarding big picture health issues as I could finally see the proverbial forest from the trees.

What did you enjoy most about the program?

Without question, my fellow colleagues were my favorite part of this program. Our class was filled with intelligent and dynamic students who each come with a different background and set of experiences to share. I have learned a great deal from my classmates-- they have helped to crystallize the in-class and extracurricular learning that will forever represent my experience in the MBA/MPH program.

What were your internships?

There is a tremendous amount of support from both the career center and the MBA/MPH advisor when it comes time to find a summer internship. When I entered the program, I was focused on spending my first summer at Genentech. Nonetheless, it was nice to have access to a tremendous support team in order to help me determine other companies and roles I may be interested in. It encouraged me to think critically about my future career goals, my skills and my areas for development.

I was fortunate to spend my first summer with Genentech's Market Planning group. This group sits on the commercial side of the organization. I targeted this group as I wanted to use my scientific analytical skills in a marketing setting. My internship goal was to provide key recommendations toward the development of new promotional materials for Rituxan, Genentech's #1 oncology product.

As it turns out, I returned to Genentech for the summer to work on the development side of the organization as part of the Product Portfolio Management group, helping to provide strategic insights and recommendations regarding the company's portfolio. I chose to use my second internship as a means to explore a different part of an organization that I know I like. Following this summer, I hope to have a much better feel for the groups and functional roles that best resonate with my skills and future career goals.

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Adit Mane, MBA/MPH 06
Senior Consultant, Strategy & Operations
Deloitte Consulting


What did you do before coming to Berkeley?

I completed my undergraduate studies at the London School of Economics and Political Science. Before graduate school, I worked with Mexico's National Institute of Public Health on researching the economics of Mexican HIV treatment policies with the goal of enabling better and more efficient treatment programs.

Why did you join the program?

My goal, upon completion of graduate school, was to work on cutting-edge healthcare issues. However, I was uncertain whether to continue working internationally on global health issues or to switch over to the private sector and work with private health industry organizations. The MBA/MPH made both career options viable and allowed me to make an informed decision. The MPH would allow me to continue learning and working on global health issues, while the MBA would develop the business skills relevant for healthcare, consulting and life science firms.

I spoke to Professor Raube and a number of MBA/MPH students before deciding that the program would be the right choice for me. Some of the students were considering careers in international health and others had chosen to focus on healthcare marketing. These conversations assured me that the program's curriculum and activities would open doors on both sides of the career equation.

Did you consider the certificate program?

No. Given my uncertainty about future careers, I needed a degree program that gave me the most choices and flexibility within broader healthcare.

What healthcare-related activities did you pursue during the program?

The program organizes a number of different healthcare-related events-- meet-and-greet sessions with alumni and small group roundtables with senior executives at prominent Bay Area organizations such as Roche Molecular Diagnostics, Blue Shield of California, and Sutter Health Care.

I was co-president of the Berkeley BioBusiness Association, a great opportunity to put my leadership training into practice, and to meet professionals from across the healthcare industry. We put together the first Bio-Entrepreneurship Roundtable at Berkeley, which was a fascinating insight for me into the world of biotech/medical device venture capital and entrepreneurship.

What healthcare class did you enjoy most?

My favorite healthcare class was Professor Raube's Public Policy in the Business of Healthcare. This class builds upon her Healthcare in the 21st Century, but it changes one key parameter: it puts students into the teaching role. Each week, small teams of students present substantial analysis on a key healthcare policy issue, either domestic or international. They also present multiple policy options towards mitigating the issue, and the options are put up to classroom debate. Whether you're presenting or participating, the class teaches you an incredible amount in a very short period of time.

What did you enjoy most about the program?

The advantage of a small class is that you develop strong, lasting relationships with your peers who are an incredibly talented and diverse group. The friendships I developed are one of the most important and enjoyable aspects of the program.

What were your internships?

The program has been fantastic in providing internship opportunities to learn about healthcare in the broadest possible sense. I wanted to pursue opportunities in global health and the private sector from the onset, and the program exceeded all my expectations.

I spent my first internship with Johnson & Johnson, LifeScan, in a marketing role. I thoroughly enjoyed my marketing class at Haas, and I wanted to put my training to work in a setting known for bringing innovative consumer-directed approaches to healthcare marketing. Subsequently, I spent a month in Kenya with three classmates on an International Business Development (IBD) assignment. Our team developed a pricing and distribution strategy to widen access to an existing reproductive health device.

My second internship was with Deloitte Consulting. After learning about marketing in an internal role with LifeScan the previous summer, I wanted to gauge my fit in an external consulting role. My summer with Deloitte was very productive: I worked with a health plan client as well as a biotechnology client during my ten-week internship. Subsequently, I spent a month in rural Maharashtra (India) with a research team composed of MBA/MPH and Ph.D. students thanks to a Berkeley Bridging the Divide Fellowship. The fellowship is awarded to multidisciplinary teams that investigate technologies that could make a real difference in resource-constrained settings. Our team worked with a number of partner organizations to evaluate the feasibility of commercializing Chinese high efficiency wood-burning stoves in rural India.

How did the dual degree help you get where you are today?

The dual degree gave me the training I needed to work on health management issues. The program introduced me to the right people along the way so I could evaluate potential career paths. It gave me a longer time horizon to make an informed decision, and gave me numerous opportunities to fully consider my alternatives. I chose to work with Deloitte Consulting upon graduation. I concluded from my summer experiences that both consulting and the culture of Deloitte Consulting were the right fit for me. It was a tough decision to not continue my career in international health upon graduation, but I am convinced that Deloitte Consulting will continue opening doors for me just like the MBA/MPH program.

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