Haas News

Dean's Letter
Responsible Business Abroad
Alumna Leads SkyDeck
Award Winner
EMBA 2.0

Dean's Letter

Balance Sheet Strength

Surging forward with physical, human, and financial capital

NAB

In the North Academic Building’s sixth-floor event space, the Berkeley-Haas community will strengthen networks and hear new ideas from faculty, alumni, and other top business leaders and thinkers. Illustration: Jeff Stikeman Architectural Art.

Berkeley-Haas’ balance sheet—the physical, human, and financial capital powering our continued rise—has never been stronger.

Our school’s reputation has thrust upward ever since moving into our current three buildings in 1995. We’ve had higher rankings, more media visibility, and deeper employer and alumni engagement. Our physical capital has hit a new inflection point with a remarkable fourth building, described in this issue. This 80,000-square-foot structure will stand at the north end of our redesigned “village square” courtyard and will include flat, flexible classrooms ideal for experiential learning, group study areas to accommodate how work in both the real world and universities has evolved, and event spaces to bring our community together with the world’s top thinkers and practitioners.

This building, funded from gifts, will add an estimated $6 million in net cash flows to the school’s annual operating budget, allowing us to serve more students. Add our new Innovation Lab at Memorial Stadium, redefined library space, and other renovations, and you have physical capital that rivals any school and, more importantly, that matches what Berkeley-Haas is about: our Defining Principles, our collaborative approach, and our incessant leaning toward the future.

On human capital, our most distinguishing asset is our faculty, also stronger than ever. Over the last five years, we have won tenured faculty battles against Stanford GSB and Harvard Business School. We have also had tenured faculty wins against Chicago, Columbia, Kellogg, and Yale. Our professional faculty—those not on the tenure track but instrumental to our teaching mission—are the envy of the industry. One top business school dean who was doing an external review told us, “I would kill to have your professional faculty.”

On financial capital, our endowment at the end of last academic year cracked $300 million for the first time, making it tied for eighth among the top 10 business schools, all nine of the others being private. I see tremendous headroom for further endowment growth. We topped the $100 million mark in 1999, with some tough financial years in between, so another tripling over the next fifteen years will have us scratching at $1 billion. With our robust physical capital, a much larger fraction of giving in our next capital campaign can go toward endowment, for example, for student aid and critical program support in entrepreneurship.

The future is bright. Thanks for being part of it.

Sincerely Yours,
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Rich Lyons, BS 82
lyons@haas.berkeley.edu | @richlyons


Responsible Business Abroad

Haas-hosted conference offers insight for White House action plan

Scott Busby, US Department of State; Prof. and Former Dean Laura Tyson; CRB Executive Director Robert Strand.

Scott Busby, US Department of State; Prof. and Former Dean Laura Tyson; CRB Executive Director Robert Strand.

How should the US government address corruption and bribery, human-trafficking and discrimination, labor rights, and environmental sustainability? Berkeley-Haas was one of only four schools nationwide invited by the White House to host a dialogue on just such topics. The goal of the February meeting was to provide input for a future national action plan regarding American corporations operating more responsibly abroad.

Haas’ Center for Responsible Business brought together senior government officials, leaders from industry and civil society, and scholars from Berkeley-Haas for the daylong conference. Many participants emphasized the need for policies to be precise and, where appropriate, to impose accountability.

Participants disagreed, however, what the smart mix of incentives and hard requirements should be. “The reality around the world is that businesses are often faced with sub-optimal choices,’’ cautioned Mark Hodge of the Global Business Initiative on Human Rights. Identifying exactly what is happening three tiers down in the supply chain can be very difficult, he noted.

When complete, the national action plan is expected to provide a blueprint for government policies that protect human rights, improve workplace safety across global supply chains, and enhance environmental sustainability.


Alumna Leads SkyDeck

Serial entrepreneur has started restructuring Berkeley startup accelerator

Caroline Winnett, MBA 90

Caroline Winnett, MBA 90

Caroline Winnett, MBA 90, took over the helm of Berkeley’s SkyDeck in November, becoming the executive director of the accelerator that offers UC Berkeley teams mentorship, working space, and exclusive contacts to help launch their businesses.

“There’s an insane amount of talent aligning here,” says Winnett. “SkyDeck has a laser focus on helping these budding entrepreneurs succeed when their team has a somewhat mature business idea.”

Winnett herself has led several startups, most recently as founder and CEO of BrandNeuro, a neuroscience-inspired marketing company. Since taking over as executive director, she’s started to restructure SkyDeck, which opened in 2012. Winnett is building more formal steps into the accelerator process, bringing in staff to support that buildout, and figuring out how to best align the university’s many resources with SkyDeck’s needs.

SkyDeck’s Shattuck Avenue penthouse now hosts 28 teams. Nine of the current SkyDeck startups and 11 former startups have Haas affiliations, including Jason Bellet, BS 14, who helped develop the digital stethoscope company Eko. Bellet and his team were recently recognized in Forbes’ 2015 “30 Under 30” list.

“The most important thing I do is listen to the startups,” says Winnett, a classically trained violinist. “You want to get to a point where they’re singing their song and people are listening.”


Award Winner

Assistant Professor Clayton Critcher

Assistant Professor Clayton Critcher

Assistant Professor Clayton Critcher of the Haas Marketing Group was one of only five researchers to receive the SAGE Young Scholars Awards by the Foundation for Personality and Social Psychology (FPSP) in collaboration with SAGE Publications. The award, given in February, recognizes outstanding young researchers in personality and social psychology and includes $5,000 for research or study. Critcher’s research focuses on judgment and decision making, self and identity, moral reasoning, and consumer experience and preferences, all with the aim of understanding how people reason about and behave in ambiguous and challenging social, economic, political, and moral settings.


EMBA 2.0

2014 class completes reinvented program

Class valedictorian Laura Adint, EMBA 14

Class valedictorian Laura Adint, EMBA 14

The inaugural Berkeley MBA for Executives (EMBA) program graduated its first 68 students in January, marking as a success Berkeley-Haas’ first new degree program since 2001. The EMBA program launched in 2013, after Berkeley-Haas and the Columbia Business School agreed to end their joint program.

This class is the first to experience the Haas School’s unique brand of experiential learning, which comprises 25 percent of the curriculum. At the heart of this new EMBA format were five immersive learning experiences led by Haas faculty on location: leadership communications in Napa Valley, entrepreneurship in Silicon Valley, applied innovation in San Francisco, business and policy in Washington, D.C., and innovative pricing in Shanghai.

“It is a different model than how Haas applies experiential learning in other MBA programs or the undergraduate program,” says Mike Rielly, assistant dean and EMBA executive director. Faculty devote a significant commitment in time and personal connections. “This is not a standard instructional delivery,” he says.

Joe Inkenbrandt, EMBA 14, a former engineer for a semiconductor company, said the program was trans- formative. “By the end of the Silicon Valley Immersion Week, I was convinced I could found a company and that it was completely doable,” says Inkenbrandt, who went on to co-found Indentify3D with Stephan Thomas, a guest speaker at one of his Haas classes.


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